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Current estimates are that as many as 15 percent of U.S. children meet the definition for having a developmental disability. Increasing biologic and experiential evidence points to the importance of identifying these developmental concerns as early as possible. This paper explores two questions: Over the past two decades, what have we learned about the early identification of children’s developmental disabilities? From a research point of view, what more do we need to do to advance the practice of early identification?

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This policy brief by the National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health looks at what happens when low-income youth and young adults with chronic conditions and disabilities age out of the Title V Program for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs and provides policy recommendations.

This policy brief by the National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health investigates the changes that result when low-income youth and young adults with disabilities lose their childhood eligibility status under SSI following the age 18 redetermination process and provides policy recommendations.